Neurology

NOMS Neurology is highly specialized in the treatment of clinical neurophysiology.

SERVICES:

EEG
An electroencephalogram (EEG) is a test used to detect abnormalities related to electrical activity of the brain. This procedure tracks and records brain wave patterns. Small metal discs with thin wires (electrodes) are placed on the scalp, and then send signals to a computer to record the results.

Evoked Potentials
An evoked potential test measures the time it takes for nerves to respond to stimulation. The size of the response is also measured. Nerves from different areas of the body may be tested. EMG: An electromyogram (EMG) measures the electrical activity of muscles when they're at rest and when they're being used. Nerve conduction studies measure how well and how fast the nerves can send electrical signals. Nerves control the muscles in the body with electrical signals called impulses. Sleep studies: Polysomnography, also called a sleep study, is a test used to diagnose sleep disorders. Polysomnography records your brain waves, the oxygen level in your blood, heart rate and breathing, as well as eye and leg movements during the study. Sleep disorders: These are problems that chronically interrupt a healthy sleep pattern including snoring, sleep apnea, insomnia, sleep deprivation, and restless legs syndrome.

EMG
An electromyogram (EMG) measures the electrical activity of muscles when they're at rest and when they're being used. Nerve conduction studies measure how well and how fast the nerves can send electrical signals. Nerves control the muscles in the body with electrical signals called impulses. Sleep studies: Polysomnography, also called a sleep study, is a test used to diagnose sleep disorders. Polysomnography records your brain waves, the oxygen level in your blood, heart rate and breathing, as well as eye and leg movements during the study. Sleep disorders: These are problems that chronically interrupt a healthy sleep pattern including snoring, sleep apnea, insomnia, sleep deprivation, and restless legs syndrome.

Sleep Studies
Polysomnography, also called a sleep study, is a test used to diagnose sleep disorders. Polysomnography records your brain waves, the oxygen level in your blood, heart rate and breathing, as well as eye and leg movements during the study. Sleep disorders: These are problems that chronically interrupt a healthy sleep pattern including snoring, sleep apnea, insomnia, sleep deprivation, and restless legs syndrome.

Sleep Disorders
These are problems that chronically interrupt a healthy sleep pattern including snoring, sleep apnea, insomnia, sleep deprivation, and restless legs syndrome.

Migraine
A migraine is a severe, painful headache that can be preceded or accompanied by sensory warning signs such as flashes of light, blind spots, tingling in the arms and legs, nausea, vomiting, and increased sensitivity to light and sound. The excruciating pain that migraines bring can last for hours or even days.

Epilepsy
A neurological disorder marked by sudden recurrent episodes of sensory disturbance, loss of consciousness, or convulsions, associated with abnormal electrical activity in the brain.

Brain Diseases
Brain diseases come in different forms. Infections, trauma, stroke, seizures, and tumors are some of the major categories of brain diseases. 

Spinal Cord Diseases
The spinal cord is the main pathway of communication between the brain and the rest of the body. It is a long, fragile, tube-like structure that extends downward from the base of the brain. The cord is protected by the back bones (vertebrae) of the spine (spinal column). The vertebrae are separated and cushioned by disks made of cartilage.

Causes of spinal cord disorders include injuries include infections, a blocked blood supply, and compression by a fractured bone or a tumor. Typically, muscles are weak or paralyzed, sensations are abnormal or lost, and controlling bladder and bowel function may be difficult. Diagnosis is based on symptoms and results of a physical examination and imaging tests, such as magnetic resonance imaging. The condition causing the spinal cord disorder is corrected if possible. Often, rehabilitation is needed to recover as much function as possible.

Nerve Diseases
Disorders of the nervous system may involve the following: Vascular disorders, such as stroke, transient ischemic attack (TIA), subarachnoid hemorrhage, subdural hemorrhage and hematoma, and extradural hemorrhage; Infections, such as meningitis, encephalitis, polio, and epidural abscess; Structural disorders, such as brain or spinal cord injury, Bell's palsy, cervical spondylosis, carpal tunnel syndrome, brain or spinal cord tumors, peripheral neuropathy, and Guillain-Barré syndrome; Functional disorders, such as headache, epilepsy, dizziness, and neuralgia; and, Degeneration, such as Parkinson disease, multiple sclerosis, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Huntington chorea, and Alzheimer disease.

Muscle Diseases
There are many problems that can affect muscles. Muscle disorders can cause weakness, pain or even paralysis. Causes of muscle disorders include injury or overuse, such as sprains or strains, cramps or tendinitis; A genetic disorder, such as muscular dystrophy; Some cancers; Inflammation, such as myositis; Diseases of nerves that affect muscles; Infections; and, Certain medicines.

Back Pain
May be caused by numerous conditions including compressed nerves; Ruptured disks; Back strain; Injured muscles, joints, ligaments or bones; Degenerative diseases; Changes in the shape of the spine; or, osteoporosis, arthritis, scoliosis, repetitive motion, obesity, injury, and stress. Most problems are solved without surgery. Neuropathy: The term used to describe a problem with the nerves, usually the 'peripheral nerves' as opposed to the 'central nervous system' (the brain and spinal cord).

Neuropathy is seen with a number of different underlying medical conditions. It can also exist without the cause being possible to diagnose when doctors called it 'idiopathic.'

Carpal Tunnel
Carpal tunnel syndrome is numbness, tingling, weakness, and other problems in the hand because of pressure on the median nerve in the wrist.

Stroke
Problems with the blood supply to the brain; either the blood supply is blocked or a blood vessel within the brain ruptures, causing brain tissue to die. 

Seizures
A seizure occurs when there's abnormal electrical activity in the brain. Seizures may go virtually unnoticed. Or, in severe cases, they may produce a change or loss of consciousness and involuntary muscle spasms called convulsions.

Multiple Sclerosis (MS)
Is a condition in which damage to the myelin coating around the nerve fibers in the central nervous system (CNS) and to the nerve fibers interferes with the transmission of nerve signals between the brain, spinal cord and the rest of the body. Disrupted nerve signals cause the symptoms of MS, which vary from one person to another and over time for any given individual, depending on where the damage occurs.

Parkinson’s Disease
A progressive disorder of the nervous system that affects movement. It develops gradually, sometimes starting with a barely noticeable tremor in just one hand. But while a tremor may be the most well-known sign of Parkinson's disease, the disorder also commonly causes stiffness or slowing of movement. Alzheimer’s disease: Alzheimer's is a type of dementia that causes problems with memory, thinking and behavior. Symptoms usually develop slowly and get worse over time, becoming severe enough to interfere with daily tasks.

Alzheimer’s Disease
Alzheimer's is a type of dementia that causes problems with memory, thinking and behavior. Symptoms usually develop slowly and get worse over time, becoming severe enough to interfere with daily tasks.