Allergy & Immunology

The Division of Allergy and Immunology offers the experience and expertise necessary to accurately diagnose and treat a full range of allergic conditions and immunological disorders.

Our doctors will work with you to control or, when possible, cure your condition, while focusing on treating any symptoms that negatively impact your health and quality of life.

What is an allergy?

An allergy is a reaction by your immune system to something that does not bother most other people. People who have allergies often are sensitive to more than one thing. Substances that often cause reactions are:

Pollen
Dust mites
Mold spores
Pet dander
Food
Insect stings
Medicines

Normally, your immune system fights germs. It is your body's defense system. In most allergic reactions, however, it is responding to a false alarm. Genes and the environment probably both play a role.

Allergies can cause a variety of symptoms such as a runny nose, sneezing, itching, rashes, swelling, or asthma. Allergies can range from minor to severe. Anaphylaxis is a severe reaction that can be life-threatening. Doctors use skin and blood tests to diagnose allergies. Treatments include medicines, allergy shots, and avoiding the substances that cause the reactions.

NIH: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

How Can I Prevent an Allergic Reaction?

The best way to prevent an allergic reaction is to avoid your allergens. It sounds so easy, but you can’t always avoid them. For example, it’s not possible to avoid all outdoor activities if you’re allergic to bees and wasps. But there are steps you can take to reduce your chances of being stung and you can carry the medicine you will need if you are stung. It is important to prepare and have an allergy action plan.

Don’t let allergies interfere with your day-to-day activities at home, work or school.  You can live a normal life despite having allergies. See your allergist for treatment and guidance. Take steps to avoid your allergens. Keep medicine with you at all times so you can treat an allergic reaction.

AAFA: Asthma & Allergy Foundation of America